#1linerWeds: Wednesday Weirdness.

Welcome to the second week of my quarantine-friendly Wednesday Weirdness strand, which is deputising for the alternative dictionary while it’s on coronavirus lockdown in the Library of Contrivance.

Today I have some animation, some music and some homemade art for you, described in my allocated one line, like so:

A friend on Facebook, a fine chap called Tom Tomski, suggested we recreate album covers with stuff we had lying around and I also composed a new musical masterpiece, which I accompanied with a rather spiffing video.

{The first three are mine, then four from Tom and three from Fi J Sanderson. Thanks guys, for letting me share your creative genius)

So, did you get them all?

#1linerWeds

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1linerWeds: Wednesday Weirdness.

Good day to you all and welcome to a new slot on Return of the Internet Nobody, while the alternative dictionary takes a break for the duration of this…extraordinary time we’re all living through, to make way for, well, weirdness.

No idea what that actually means in the long run, but it’ll be original content, it’ll be on Wednesdays until further notice and, needless to say, it’ll be weird.

It could be music, videos, GIFs, animation, digital art, anything at all, the only thing they will have in common is that they will only have a one line explanation. This allows me to continue crowbarring them into Linda’s One Liner Wednesday feature and gives me something to do that takes longer than coming up with a bad pun once a week.

So…

I made a video to go with my latest original composition, “Fazer”; created using a timelapse of a cycle ride to the park, which you can see in this gif..

…and which you can watch in all its psychedelic glory, right here on YouTube.

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Return of DJ Nobody.

To help take my mind off the stress and turmoil of the past few weeks, I’ve been mucking around with audio-visual gadgets again, to bring you two additions to my ever-expanding collection of psychedelic remix videos.

The first frenetic explosion of sound and colour is an unlikely collision between African rhythms and Balearic beats, mixing The Sahara All-Stars with Beat Connection, resulting in Take Your Balearic Trunk Soul Rhythm

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Secondly, a more subtle reworking of a song by electronic music innovator and producer, Imogen Heap, the lovely Glittering Cloud, unimaginatively renamed by me as Stuttering Cloud.

Mixing it up.

During my extended medical absence from work, (which comes to an end tomorrow) I downloaded an app called edjing, which is a full set of DJ decks with all the gadgets required to make high quality mixes from my extensive mp3 collection.

I began by playing around with small samples of tracks, just to get the hang of mixing (which I have never attempted until now, despite always wanting to have a go) then advanced to remixing entire songs.

It shouldn’t really be a surprise to discover that among the first victims recipients of my remixing skills were Kraftwerk, given my previously documented appreciation of their robotic rhythms; but it also turns out that their precision engineered style makes their material remarkably easy to combine in a mix.

Here is Antenna, from Radio Activity, spliced with a sample of Pocket Calculator percussion, from the career-defining Computer World album.

It’s called, rather predictably, Pocket Antenna.

For a more lively visual treat, here’s a remix of Numbers, with an added sample from Control by a band called Operators, accompanied by another of my psychedelic videos.

You’ll never guess what it’s called; Number Control.

I had even more fun, mixing a sample from It’s More Fun To Compute with the dynamic Dusseldorfers’ self-aware hit, The Robots, which you can listen to at the link below.

CLICK HERE »»» ***It’s More Fun To Robot***

Finally, for a bit of variety, I made an extended mix of the Grimes bonus track, Angel, adding some wispy visuals for extra atmosphere.

Visible vibes.

Over the last week, I have once again been messing around with my music apps; Oscilab, the loop maker and sequencer on my phone, combined with a beta-test version of the Poweramp music player on my tablet, which includes a new “visualisation” feature.

This transforms any audio signal played through it into a complex and synchronised series of patterns which are unique to each sound, allowing you to “see” the music.

Like, far out, man.

Unfortunately there is no way to save the resulting psychedelic visual display, unless you get creative and improvise a little, of course.

So I built myself a studio in the airing cupboard; a black box with my tablet lying in the bottom of it and a sheet of glass on top with my phone on top of that.

Then, with my phone camera turned on, all I needed to do was line up my tablet in the video viewfinder, press play on the tablet and record on the camera, then close the door and wait for my latest musical creation to finish playing.

Once I have video of the unique patterns produced by my new tune, all that remains is for me to edit the video to the exact length of the audio track, (cutting out me turning on the tablet and removing any blank screen from the end) remove the sound from the raw video, dub the music back over the edited footage and; Voila! another masterpiece.

I’m not one for leaving an idea alone, once I’ve convinced myself of its brilliance, so I ended up making four new electronic soundscapes in the last few days, all with their own trippy visual accompaniment.

I’m posting one of the most melodic and chilled-out numbers here, which I’ve called The Glimmering, but you can also find it, along with all the rest of this week’s audio output (plus one earlier attempt) on my new page, Sound and vision: The Oscilab project, via that link or the drop-down menu at the top of the page.

I hope you enjoy the soothing tones of this adventure in electronic psychedelia and when you’ve sampled its peculiar delights, why not visit the new page for yourselves and check out the rest of my collection.

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